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The Northeast Monsoon or Amihan has slightly weakened but continues to blow through extreme Northern Luzon, while the warm and humid Easterlies, dominate the remaining parts of the country.

In the next hours, Eastern Visayas, Central Visayas, Northern Mindanao, Caraga, and Davao Region will have cloudy skies with scattered rain showers and thunderstorms that may trigger flash floods or landslides. In Batanes and the Babuyan Group of Islands, cloudy skies with scattered rains will prevail. The rest of the country, including Metro Manila, can enjoy generally fair weather as partly cloudy to cloudy skies will prevail only with chances of isolated rain showers.

 

Gale warning has been lifted as well, as Amihan weakens. However, colder days are likely to prevail in February as Siberian winds reintensify.

 

 

In today’s interview with PAGASA Weather Forecaster Robert Badrina, he mentioned that no weather disturbance is expected within the next three day.

Two weather systems will continue to bring lights rains to Northern and Central Luzon today.
 
According to PAGASA, the Northeast Monsoon or Amihan has intensified, bringing cloudy skies with light rains in Cordillera, Batanes, Babuyan, Cagayan and Isabela. In Eastern and Central Visayas, Bicol Region, Aurora and Quezon, cloudy skies with scattered rain showers and isolated thunderstorms will be experienced due to the Tail-End of a Cold Front. In Metro Manila, Ilocos Region and the rest of Central Luzon and Cagayan Valley, partly cloudy to cloudy skies will be experienced with light rains. In the remaining parts of the country, generally fair weather will be experienced only with isolated rain showers or thunderstorms.
 
Because of the surge of Amihan, gale warning is still in effect in the seaboards of Northern Luzon where wave height may reach up to 3.4 to 4.5 meters. Fishing boats and other small seacraft are advised not to venture out into the sea, while larger sea vessels are alerted against big waves in Batanes, Babuyan Group of Islands, Cagayan, the northern and western coasts of Ilocos Norte, the northern coast of Isabela, Ilocos Sur, La Union, Pangasinan, Aurora, and the eastern coast of Quezon including Polilio Island.
 
In an interview with PAGASA Weather Forecaster Mendoza, he said that the country is expected to remain storm-free in the next two to three days.
 

 
After a short break last week, the Northeast Monsoon is back and has further intensified.
 
Today, the Northeast Monsoon or Amihan brings cool breezes and rains in Northern and Central Luzon. Meanwhile, the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) and Easterlies dampen Mindanao, and the eastern sections Southern Luzon and Visayas, respectively.
 
Today, Quezon, the Bicol Region, Eastern Visayas and Mindanao will have cloudy skies with scattered rain showers and thunderstorms. In Metro Manila, Ilocos Region, Cordillera, Cagayan Valley, and Central Luzon, partly cloudy to cloudy skies will be experienced with isolated light rains. In the rest of the country, partly cloudy to cloudy skies with isolated rain showers will prevail.
 
Gale warning is still raised in the northern seaboards of Northern Luzon. These include Batanes, Calayan, Babuyan, and the northern coasts of Cagayan and Ilocos Norte. Due to rough to very rough seas, fishing boats and other small seacraft are advised not to venture out while larger vessels are alerted against big waves.
 
Cooler Days Ahead
Temperatures continue to dip as the Northeast Monsoon, the cold and dry air from Siberia, intensifies. Yesterday, a chilling 16.6 degrees Celsius was recorded in Baguio City. In Tanay, Rizal 17 degrees Celsius was recorded, while the temperature dropped to 21 degrees Celsius in Infanta, Quezon. The surge of Amihan is expected in January and February.
 

 
 
ITCZ dampens Southern Mindanao
 
Lightning, occasionally heavy rains, strong winds and flash floods are possible in Southern Mindanao as the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) affects the region today.
 
The ITCZ is an area where winds coming from the Northern and Southern Hemispheres meet; this interaction results in rains in the affected areas. ITCZ is also composed of a series of Low Pressure Areas (LPA) which can develop into weather disturbances.
 
As this weather system prevails, the Zamboanga Peninsula, SOCSKSARGEN, ARMM and Davao Region will experience cloudy skies with scattered rain showers and thunderstorms. The rest of Mindanao, all the way up to Visayas and Luzon will have generally fair weather except for chances of localized thunderstorms.
 
In an interview with PAGASA Weather Forecaster Chris Perez, he mentioned that no weather disturbance affects the country today but a cloud cluster is being monitored outside the Philippine Area of Responsibility (PAR).
 
 

(As of 9:00 PM today) Due to the inclement weather brought by Tropical Depression Maring, here’s a list of schools and areas where classes have been suspended for tomorrow, September 13, 2017.
 
ALL LEVELS
 
Muntinlupa
Las Piñas
Cavite Province
University of Santo Tomas
Laguna Province
Olongapo City
Zambales Province
Guagua, Pampanga
Bulacan: Meycauayan, Marilao
Rizal: Baras, Angono, San Mateo, Morong, Tanay, Taytay, Cainta, Binangonan, Pililla, Rodriguez
 
 
PRESCHOOL TO SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
Batangas Province

 
 
Rains affect western section of Luzon
 
The Southwest Monsoon, warm and moist air coming from the Indian Ocean has slightly weakened in the absence of a weather disturbance surrounding the Philippine Area of Responsibility (PAR).
 
But today, it still affects the western section of Northern and Central Luzon, bringing cloudy skies with light to moderate rains in Ilocos Region, Zambales and Bataan.
 
In the rest of Luzon including Metro Manila, down to Visayas and Mindanao, partly cloudy to cloudy skies will prevail with possible isolated rain shower and thunderstorms.
 
The country will remain storm-free in the next two to three days.
 
Question of the Day
Panahon TV follower Gerby Flores asked: “Ilang bagyo ang papasok kapag August?” (How many tropical cyclones will enter or develop this August?)
 
According to PAGASA Weather Forecaster Gener Quitlong, two to four tropical cyclones may enter or develop in PAR this month based on climatological records.
 
These tropical cyclones’ track may be a hit or miss. If these weather disturbances hit the landmass, it may make landfall in Northern Luzon.
 

 

IMAGE FROM: https://climate.nasa.gov/system/content_pages/main_images/1320_effects-image.jpg


On the first day of June 2017, United States President Donald Trump withdrew from the Paris Climate Agreement, a global effort that aims to limit carbon emission. This decision has caused quite a stir, especially since the US is the second largest carbon emitter in the world. Despite this, the Philippines, together with more than a hundred nations, continue its fight against climate change.

As citizens of a country exposed and vulnerable to the effects of climate change, we need to understand it better. Here are answers to some of the frequently-asked questions about climate change:

1. What’s the difference between climate change and global warming?

These terms are sometimes used interchangeably, but refer to different things. Global warming is the long-term warming of the planet. The average global surface temperature has crawled up by about 0.8 degrees Celsius relative to the mid-20th century baseline.

Climate Change includes global warming, and talks about the broader range of changes in our planet, which include rising sea levels, shrinking glaciers and the melting of ice in Greenland, Antarctica and the Arctic. All of these are the consequences of the warming caused by the burning of fossil fuels.

2. What’s the difference between weather and climate?

Weather refers to the local changes in short timescales and is basically what you see outside on any particular day. This can change from minute to minute, hour to hour, day to day or season to season.

Meanwhile, climate refers to the general weather pattern in a specific area that involves temperature, humidity, rainfall, air pressure and other meteorological variables over a long period of time. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) defines this as the average weather condition based on 30 years of observation.

3. What is the Greenhouse Effect?

The Greenhouse Effect is the process in which heat gets trapped in the surface of the Earth because of too much concentration of greenhouse gases like carbon dioxide, methane and nitrous oxides. These gases blanket the planet, making it much warmer.

Greenhouse gases keep our planet liveable because without these, the Earth will be an icy planet. Despite being a natural part of the atmosphere, the level of these gases, especially carbon dioxide, has been rising consistently for decades because of human activities. More heat is trapped, leading to higher temperatures.

Rising temperatures contribute to the intensity of tropical cyclones, and the increased duration and amount of rain, extreme drought and habitat loss for various species.

4. Do scientists agree on climate change?

Yes. According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), the vast majority of climate scientists or about 97% agree that humans are causing climate change. Moreover, most of the leading science organizations around the world have issued public statements confirming the existence of climate change and global warming.

NOAA added that some scientists that reject the idea are not experts on climate or do not understand the scientific basis of long-term climate processes.

5. Are volcanoes related to climate change?

When volcanic eruption occurs around every 20 years, this causes a massive release of particles and other gases.
This event leads to global cooling where droplets of sulphur-rich aerosols reflect sunlight from the Earth—just like when Mount Pinatubo erupted on 1991 where an estimated 20 million tons of sulphur dioxide and ash particles shot up to more than 20 kilometers into the atmosphere. NASA noted that over the next 15 months, scientists measured an average global temperature decrease of about 0.6 degrees Celsius since the eruption.

6. Can climate change trigger earthquakes?

Some scientists and geologists claim that changes in seasonal rainfall and their frequency contribute to the occurrence of earthquakes. However, scientific evidence is not enough to support this.

Shankar Nath of the Indian Institute of Technology at West Bengal said climate change has no impact on the incidence of earthquakes. Supporting this is Sunanda Bandapadhyay, a geographer from Calcutta University, who believes that the recent human-induced acceleration in global temperatures is insufficient to have any noticeable impact on the Earth’s tectonic processes that cause earthquakes. The impact of climate change on tectonic activities is still an ongoing debate.


Sources:

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)
National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)
www.thethirdpole.net

 
 
Warm Weather on Rizal’s Birth Anniversary
 
The Ridge of a High Pressure Area (HPA) continues to bring generally fair weather in the country. This weather system suppresses cloud formation, causing lesser chance of rains. As it prevails today, partly cloudy to cloudy skies prevail in Luzon, Visayas and Mindanao though isolated rain showers and thunderstorms are still possible.
 
In an interview with PAGASA Weather Forecaster Samuel Duran, he mentioned that no weather disturbance is expected to affect the country within the next two to three days.
 

 
Non-working Holiday
 
While it’s a back-to-work Monday in most areas of the country, some provinces are enjoying an extended vacation today. These include Ifugao, which celebrates its provincial foundation anniversary, and Laguna, the birthplace of Dr. Jose Rizal whose birth we commemorate today.
 
Here are expected weather conditions and temperatures in these areas:
 

 
 

 
 
Moderate rains continue in Palawan
 
The Southwest Monsoon, locally known as Habagat continues to affect the eastern section of Luzon.
 
As this weather system prevails, Palawan will continue to experience light to moderate rain showers and thunderstorms. In the rest of the country including Metro Manila, partly cloudy to cloudy skies will prevail only with isolated rain showers or thunderstorms.
 

 
With rains concentrated in Palawan, humid weather is still expected to prevail in most parts of the country.
 

 
Get to Know Habagat
Every year, when the rainy season begins, Habagat begins to affect the country. Due to its warm and moist characteristics, Habagat causes monsoon rains that could last for a couple of days or even a week. Here are things you must know about this weather system: