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Each night is a chance to behold a divine masterpiece. Just look up and you can see the stars twinkling like gems on the endless black canvas of sky. In movies, lovers often stargaze, naming stars after each other. The idea of actually owning a star and naming it after someone is fascinating, but the question remains: is it possible in real life?

According to the International Astronomical Union, it is impossible to legally buy a star and name it after someone. So be wary of companies that claim to be official star –naming agencies. One of which is the International Star Registry, which used to offer helping clients name a star in honor of their loved ones. But in 1998, the company was issued a violation by the New York City Department of Consumer Affairs for “deceptive advertising.”

This is because the only way for stars to be named legitimately is through the International Astronomical Union (IAU), an association of professional astronomers, dedicated to professional research and education in astronomy.  Stars are given names for one reason alone—for astronomers to locate these celestial bodies more easily. In fact, the IAU has dissociated entirely from advertising and commercial practices to strengthen its identity as an international scientific organization.

To name stars, they are first sorted according to their brightness. Proper names are given up to the third brightest stars. Because history reveals that much of the modern math and astronomy we use today originated in Arabia, some of the stars’ names are Arabic, such  as Betelgeuse and Dubhe.

 

Another system that the IAU follows in naming stars was proposed by Johann Bayer of Bavaria. Bayer assigned letters from the Greek alphabet to the brightest stars of each constellation. Using his system, Polaris is called Alpha Ursae Minoris, while Dubhe is Alpha Ursae Majoris.

Meanwhile, faint stars were named through catalogs prepared by astronomers. Frequently used catalogs include the Bonner Durchmusterung, Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO), The Yale Star and The Henry Draper  published by the Harvard College Observatory. A specialized catalog called the Deep Objective Prism Survey of the Large Magellanic Cloud published by Warner and Swasey Observatory was used to name the Supernova of 1987 (Supernova 1987A), one of the major astronomical events of this century identified with the star named SK -69 202.

These are the only systems accepted and used by the International Astronomical Union.  

But in the end, how stars are named doesn’t alter the beauty of the night sky. When darkness reigns, everyone on this planet gets to witness the breathtaking scenery that satisfies our inner astrophiles.

 

Sources: International Astronomical Union, UW Madison Astronomy

By Charie Abarca, Panahon TV Intern

Each night is a chance to behold a divine masterpiece. Just look up and you can see the stars twinkling like gems on the endless black canvas of sky. In movies, lovers often stargaze, naming stars after each other. The idea of actually owning a star and naming it after someone is fascinating, but the question remains: is it possible in real life?

According to the International Astronomical Union, it is impossible to legally buy a star and name it after someone. So be wary of companies that claim to be official star –naming agencies. One of which is the International Star Registry, which used to offer helping clients name a star in honor of their loved ones. But in 1998, the company was issued a violation by the New York City Department of Consumer Affairs for“deceptive advertising.”

This is because the only way for stars to be named legitimately is through the International Astronomical Union (IAU), an association of professional astronomers, dedicated to professional research and education in astronomy. Stars are given names for one reason alone—for astronomers to locate these celestial bodies more easily. In fact, the IAU has dissociated entirely from advertising and commercial practices to strengthen its identity as an international scientific organization.

To name stars, they are first sorted according to their brightness. Proper names are given up to the third brightest stars.Because history reveals that much of the modern math and astronomy we use today originated in Arabia, some of the stars’ names are Arabic, such as Betelgeuse and Dubhe.

Another system that the IAU follows in naming stars was proposed by Johann Bayerof Bavaria. Bayer assigned letters from the Greek alphabet to thebrightest stars of each constellation. Using his system, Polaris is called Alpha UrsaeMinoris, while Dubhe is Alpha UrsaeMajoris.

Meanwhile, faint stars were named through catalogs prepared by astronomers. Frequently used catalogsinclude the Bonner Durchmusterung, Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO), The Yale Star and The Henry Draper published by the Harvard College Observatory. A specialized catalog called the Deep Objective Prism Survey of the Large Magellanic Cloud published by Warner and Swasey Observatory was used to name the Supernova of 1987(Supernova 1987A), one of the major astronomical events of this centuryidentified with the star named SK -69 202.

These are the only systems accepted and used by the International Astronomical Union.

But in the end, how stars are named doesn’t alter the beauty of the night sky. When darkness reigns, everyone on this planet gets to witness the breathtaking scenery that satisfies our inner astrophiles.

 

Sources: International Astronomical Union, UW Madison Astronomy

 

By Charie Abarca, PanahonTV Intern

 

Because of the increased awareness on astronomical events, such as meteor showers, eclipses and the photogenic super moon, more and more people are capturing these phenomena using their mobile phones and cameras. According to Astronomy Online, this particular hobby, also called astrophotography, seems to be the most popular topic in this branch of natural science.

 

Types of Astrophotography

  There are different types of astrophotography. Some are relatively easy to do, especially for beginners with nothing more than a DSLR (Digital Single-Lens Reflex) camera and a tripod. Others are more advanced and require a lot more gear.

 

Night Sky Photography

This type of photography only needs a simple set-up involving your camera, tripod and a good view of the night sky. Yet, if done right, the results can be breathtaking.

According to Photography Talk, night sky photography isn’t limited to photos of the stars; here, you can also capture constellations, star trails, the northern lights, and the Milky Way itself. Just how much detail you get in your photos depends on your camera. 

Piggyback Photography

To capture the night sky, one will need a telescope on which to mount the camera. According to Weasner, a website that discusses Astronomy-related topics, this set-up allows the telescope to track the movement of the night sky, compensating for the Earth’s rotation.

Photo by: ASTRONOMY HINTS
Photo by: NIGHT SKY IN FOCUS
Photo by: Grelf

According to Astronomy for Beginners,Prime-Focus Photography gives a surprisingly small image, so it’s not ideal for capturing planets. But its advantage is that it can capture any celestial object in the night sky unseen by the naked eye.

 

Afocal Astrophotography

To do this, one needs to center the telescope’s eyepiece to the desired celestial object before holding the camera over the eyepiece. You can take a lot of photos of the object that is aligned or at the center of the eyepiece. The good news is you can use your mobile phone for this method as done in the photo below.

Eyepiece Projection Astrophotography

Like the Afocal Astrophotography, you will need to attach the camera to the telescope with the use of the T-ring and the camera-to-telescope adapter. But this time, the eyepiece will also be attached to the camera. According to Weasner, the eyepiece is inserted into the large tube of the adapter, which is then inserted into the eyepiece holder on the telescope. The camera is attached to the adapter using a T-Ring. The image from the eyepiece is “projected” onto the camera film or sensor. Objects tend to be fainter when imaged with this technique, due to the projection. 

Photo by: ASTRONOMY SOURCE
Photo by: WEASNER

Taking photos in an urban area

Light pollution in urban areas makes astrophotography challenging. In a place like Manila, which is surrounded by tall buildings and city lights, the night sky is more likely to be obscured. Try to find a spot away from artificial lights and sky clutter to maximize your photo taking.

Dos and Don’ts of Astrophotography

 

DON’TS

 

 

Taking photos of the night sky and other celestial objects requires patience and dedication. Observing the sky is fun, but it’s even more fulfilling if you capture the moment using the various methods of astrophotography.

 

BY Ronalyn Tindog, PanahonTV Intern

 
Some areas in Northern and Central Luzon will continue to experience lights rains today.
 
According to PAGASA, the Northeast Monsoon or Amihan prevails in Northern Luzon, bringing cloudy skies with light rains in Cordillera, Batanes, Babuyan, Cagayan and Ilocos Norte. In Isabela, Aurora and Quezon, cloudy skies with scattered rain showers and isolated thunderstorms will be experienced due to the Tail-End of a Cold Front. In the rest of the country, including Metro Manila, partly cloudy to cloudy skies will be experienced but localized thunderstorms are still possible.
 

 
Because of the surge of Amihan, gale warning is still in effect off the seaboards of Northern Luzon where wave height may reach up to 3.4 to 4.5 meters. Fishing boats and other small seacraft are advised not to venture out into the sea, while larger sea vessels are alerted against big waves in Batanes, the Babuyan Group of Islands, Ilocos Norte, Ilocos Sur, the northern and eastern coasts of Cagayan, Isabela.
 
Supermoon brightened the sky
Last night, a larger and brighter moon graced the skies to the delight of selenophiles or moon lovers.
This astronomical event happens when the moon, at a full phase, coincides with the perigee or its closest distance to the Earth. Yesterday, the moon reached its perigee at 4:43 PM and its full phase at 11:47 PM. PAGASA said that the moon appeared 14% larger and 30% brighter than usual.
 

LOOK | Tonight's Supermoon as seen in Tanza, Cavite. The Moon reached its Perigee (its closest distance to the Earth) at 4:43 PM earlier. At 11:47 PM, it will reach a Full Moon phase and can appear up to 14% larger and 30% brighter than usual.Photos and video captured by Mary Crystalline T. Araracap

Posted by Panahon.TV on Sunday, December 3, 2017

 
After a two-week hiatus, the Southwest Monsoon prevails in the country again.
 
Locally known as Habagat, the Southwest Monsoon is defined as warm and moist winds moving in a southwest direction. Due to these characteristics, Habagat can cause monsoon rains that can last for a couple of days or even a week.
 
Cloudy skies with light to moderate rain showers and thunderstorms will prevail in Visayas, Mindanao, the Ilocos Region, the Cordillera Administrative Region, MIMAROPA, Batanes and the Babuyan Group of Islands. Meanwhile, the rest of Luzon including Metro Manila will experience generally fair weather with localized thunderstorms.
 

 
 
Special Weather Forecast
 
Classes in public schools and work in government offices for tomorrow September 21, 2017 have been suspended. According to Malacañang, the declaration is in line with the 45th anniversary of the declaration of Martial Law and will not be a special non-working holiday but a “Day of Protest.”
 
Pro and anti-government activities are expected to be staged tomorrow, while some may use the suspension to unwind from work and school. According to PAGASA, no weather disturbance is expected to affect the country during the observance.
 
 

 
 

 
 
ITCZ dampens Southern Mindanao
 
Lightning, occasionally heavy rains, strong winds and flash floods are possible in Southern Mindanao as the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) affects the region today.
 
The ITCZ is an area where winds coming from the Northern and Southern Hemispheres meet; this interaction results in rains in the affected areas. ITCZ is also composed of a series of Low Pressure Areas (LPA) which can develop into weather disturbances.
 
As this weather system prevails, the Zamboanga Peninsula, SOCSKSARGEN, ARMM and Davao Region will experience cloudy skies with scattered rain showers and thunderstorms. The rest of Mindanao, all the way up to Visayas and Luzon will have generally fair weather except for chances of localized thunderstorms.
 
In an interview with PAGASA Weather Forecaster Chris Perez, he mentioned that no weather disturbance affects the country today but a cloud cluster is being monitored outside the Philippine Area of Responsibility (PAR).
 
 

(As of 9:00 PM today) Due to the inclement weather brought by Tropical Depression Maring, here’s a list of schools and areas where classes have been suspended for tomorrow, September 13, 2017.
 
ALL LEVELS
 
Muntinlupa
Las Piñas
Cavite Province
University of Santo Tomas
Laguna Province
Olongapo City
Zambales Province
Guagua, Pampanga
Bulacan: Meycauayan, Marilao
Rizal: Baras, Angono, San Mateo, Morong, Tanay, Taytay, Cainta, Binangonan, Pililla, Rodriguez
 
 
PRESCHOOL TO SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
Batangas Province

 
 
ITCZ dampens National Heroes Day celebration
 
Filipinos continue to enjoy the three-day weekend as the country celebrates its annual National Heroes Day or Pambansang Araw ng mga Bayani.
 
But amidst the celebration, residents of some areas are warned about possible effects of the prevailing weather system, the Intertropical Convergence Zone. The ITCZ is an area where winds coming from the Northern and Southern Hemispheres meet; this interaction results in rains in the affected areas. ITCZ is also composed of a series of Low Pressure Areas (LPA) which can develop into weather disturbances.
 

 
Today, the Bicol Region, Visayas, Caraga, Northern Mindanao and Zamboanga Peninsula will have cloudy skies with light to moderate rains and possible thunderstorms. In the rest of the country including Metro Manila, fair weather will prevail except for isolated rain showers and thunderstorms.
 
New weather disturbance spotted outside PAR
 
Meanwhile, the tropical depression outside the Philippine Area of Responsibility (PAR) is still being monitored. At 3:00 AM today, it was located at 2,590 kilometers east of Extreme Northern Luzon. It has maximum sustained winds of 40 kilometers per hour (kph) and gustiness of up to 50 kph. If this weather disturbance continues to move in a north-northwest direction, it may no longer enter PAR.
 

 

 
 
Rains affect western section of Luzon
 
The Southwest Monsoon, warm and moist air coming from the Indian Ocean has slightly weakened in the absence of a weather disturbance surrounding the Philippine Area of Responsibility (PAR).
 
But today, it still affects the western section of Northern and Central Luzon, bringing cloudy skies with light to moderate rains in Ilocos Region, Zambales and Bataan.
 
In the rest of Luzon including Metro Manila, down to Visayas and Mindanao, partly cloudy to cloudy skies will prevail with possible isolated rain shower and thunderstorms.
 
The country will remain storm-free in the next two to three days.
 
Question of the Day
Panahon TV follower Gerby Flores asked: “Ilang bagyo ang papasok kapag August?” (How many tropical cyclones will enter or develop this August?)
 
According to PAGASA Weather Forecaster Gener Quitlong, two to four tropical cyclones may enter or develop in PAR this month based on climatological records.
 
These tropical cyclones’ track may be a hit or miss. If these weather disturbances hit the landmass, it may make landfall in Northern Luzon.